Archive for the Shownotes Category

Episode 79: Lizzie Borden Revisted

Posted 29 October 2016 by
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Is there a better time to revisit our favorite Victorian More-Than-Likely Murderess, Lizzie Borden, than right now? We think not.

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Lizzie Borden took an axe gave her mother 40 whacks, when the evil deed was done, she gave her father 41.

Hatchet. Step-mother. Closer to 28 whacks total. And the big question: did Lizzie even do it? We talk about the family, the times, the build-up, the weirdness, speculation and aftermath of the headline grabbing story the changed the quiet life of a 32-year-old Lizzie Borden. (And her father and stepmother, natch.)

Lizzie became quite the cover girl!

Lizzie became quite the cover girl!

Since we first recorded this in 2011, there’s been some improvement in our sound. We’ve cleaned up the audio a little, and cried at the sound of the five-year-old at the beginning who is now in middle school. (WAH!)

 

Since 2011 Christina Ricci has played Lizzie in both a movie and a tv show

Since 2011 Christina Ricci has played Lizzie in both a movie and a tv show!

There are so many places you can look more into the life and mystery of Lizzie- here are our ORIGINAL SHOWNOTES with books, movies and links to get you going on your own detective work…did she or didn’t she?

 

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Episode 78 : Shirley Chisholm

Posted 26 October 2016 by
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We wrap up our short series of “women who ran for the US Presidency before Hillary Clinton” with Shirley Chisholm!

Photo Credit: John O'Halloran, US News & World Report

Photo Credit: John O’Halloran, US News & World Report

Shirley St. Hill was born in 1924 in Brooklyn, NY to Charles and Ruby St. Hill. Her parents were both immigrants from the West Indies and they made a painful decision to send Shirley and two of her sisters to live their early youth on her grandmother’s farm in Barbados.

Shirley’s education was solid: prestigious Girl’s High in Brooklyn, Bachelors degree in Sociology with a minor in Spanish from Brooklyn College, Masters Degree in Early Childhood Education from Columbia… she was smart, she was quick, she was well spoken, well read and well, she had a dynamic personality wrapped in a very petite frame.

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Episode 77: Belva Lockwood

Posted 23 October 2016 by
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Belva Lockwood, pioneer in the field of law, and second woman candidate for President.

Belva Lockwood, pioneer in the field of law, and second woman candidate for President.

We continue our series of Presidential candidates with Belva Lockwood, the woman who many regard as the first “legitimate” female nominee for the office. You be the judge; certainly, her age and employment history are a contrast to Victoria Woodhull, (covered here), whose earlier campaign, in 1872, was tainted by scandal (and marred by not meeting the age requirement of 35).

This woman had it all together, but it hadn't come easily!

This woman had it all together, but it hadn’t come easily!

Belva Bennett Lockwood was born in 1830 on a farm in upstate NY. She paid for and arranged her own education, but family pressure drove her to marriage rather than college.

 
Being widowed at 22 changed the course of her life; teaching, college, law school, and finally the groundbreaking milestone of being the first woman to argue cases before the Supreme Court.

Belva was not only a pioneer herself, but sponsored other trailblazers to the Court..

Belva was not only a pioneer herself, but sponsored other trailblazers to the Court..

Then, in 1884, Belva Lockwood ran as the Equal Rights party’s candidate for President. She was no fool; the Presidency was a long shot, but the impact on society would be undeniable. She took the inevitable backlash in stride, saying that being featured in a political cartoon was an accomplishment in itself.

You have to be famous in the first place to be mocked in the national media!

You have to be famous in the first place to be mocked in the national media!

A halfhearted attempt at the office in 1888 ended her quest for elected office, but her reputation was such that several Presidents, many educational institutions, and the Nobel Peace Prize Committee all relied on her advice.

Her portrait in the National Portrait Gallery.

Her portrait in the National Portrait Gallery.

Belva’s example had been an inspiration for women to move into a sphere that had been denied them. (A convention of female lawyers she chaired in 1893 had over 200 attendees.)

 
Belva Lockwood died in 1917, having forged a path of education, advocacy, and determination for generations to follow.

 
When asked if there would ever be a woman President, Belva said:

If a woman demonstrates that she is fitted to be president, she will someday occupy the White House. It will be entirely on her own merits, however. No movement will place her there simply because she is a woman. It will come if she proves herself fit for the position.

Listen to the audio for her life in detail!

Here are the books Beckett recommended:

"Ballots For Belva" by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen

“Ballots For Belva” by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen

"Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would be President" by Jill Norgren

“Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would be President” by Jill Norgren

The closing song is “Keep on the Path” by The Mystery Body.

Episode 75: Marie Curie Part Two

Posted 17 September 2016 by
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Marie faced life after Pierre Curie died with two children, more than just a touch of radiation exposure and a desire to use science to help all humanity but she also had a lot of non-science drama on the horizon.

Nobel portrait, circa 1911

Nobel portrait, circa 1911

 

Brief recap: Polish born genius navigates an early life filled with heartache and challenges to pursue one of academics and science in Pre-WWI Paris. She finds love, builds a family and when her partner in love and work, Pierre, dies in a horrible accident everything seems to be crashing down on her. Details on Part One, you should go listen.

Back in her Manya days. L-R: Manya, Papa, Bronya and poor, 2nd place Hela.

Back in her Poland Manya days. L-R: Manya, Papa, Bronya and poor, 2nd place Hela.

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Episode 74: Marie Curie Part One

Posted 27 August 2016 by
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A lot of people only know Marie Curie as a woman who won a Nobel prize (or two…spoilers) but that is just a small part of the life of this intelligent, brave, determined and focused physicist, wife and mother. Her life was so full it’s going to take us two episodes to bring it to you.

Marya Sklodowska was born in Russian controlled Warsaw, Poland, in 1867, the 5th child of two educators. But before you think that having teachers for parents must have made getting an education easy, think again. The Russians weren’t fooling around when they told the people of Poland that they were Russian now, forget everything Polish. And the Polish people weren’t fooling around when they said, “uh, yeah, about that…no.” This meant that Manya (her nickname), her sisters and brother had to learn twice as much: what the Russian education system expected and what their heritage and love of Poland dictated.

Manya (because we love the name and will use it as long as we can) at 16

Manya (because we love the name and will use it as long as we can) at 16

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Episode 73: Agrippina the Younger

Posted 6 August 2016 by
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Julia Agrippina (the Younger) was born on November 6, 15 AD just one year after Caesar Augustus died…that would be Great Grandpa Augusta to Agrippina. She was the first daughter to Germanicus, a very popular military general, and Agrippina the Elder a very brave and unconventional Roman military wife. Although her father would die when she was very young  coughpoisoncough and the rest of her family didn’t fare so well either, Agrippina would do what was needed to survive a very high profile life in a society where “high profile” meant “giant target.”Rome_Agrippina_Minor

This episode was a little different for both of us– the magnitude of materials we needed to reference so that we could puzzle together Agrippina’s life was surprising. We cover that dramatic life as the daughter of a military leader, the sister to an emperor, the wife AND niece to another emperor and the mother to yet another…but we also talked about life, challenges, customs and survival strategies for women in ancient Rome.

And we talk a lot about poison.

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Episode 72: Elizabeth Keckly

Posted 16 July 2016 by
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When we were researching Mary Lincoln we both admired her friend, Elizabeth Keckly, so much that we knew that had to talk about her. She was born a slave, eventually bought her freedom and built a very successful business (twice) all before she, too, realized her own White House dream. Yes indeed- Lizzie needs her time in the spotlight.Keckley1870framed

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Episode 71: Schuyler Sisters with Amanda Vaill

Posted 25 June 2016 by
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schuyler sisters

Since the musical Hamilton opened on Broadway we’ve been getting a lot of requests to cover the Schuyler sisters, Angelica, Eliza and Peggy. (You sang that, right?) But we couldn’t make it work because there wasn’t enough material available to us to fill a whole show in the way we would want to…so we met someone who could:.

Author Amanda Vaill.

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Episode 70: Mary Lincoln Part Two

Posted 11 June 2016 by
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In our last episode we talked about Mary’s childhood, education and life as the wife of Abraham Lincoln. She was described as, “amiable, accomplished, gracious and a sparkling talker,” by members of the Republican Party before she got to Washington…so what happened afterward that left her without this glowing impression?

Frida Kahlo may have approved of the fluffy dresses and floral head bling.

Frida Kahlo may have approved of the fluffy dresses and floral head bling.

 

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Episode 69: Mary Todd Lincoln, Part One

Posted 4 June 2016 by
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Mary Todd Lincoln’s life can’t be defined by who she married and her husband’s legacy–she was a lot more than simply a southern born wife of a president. Actually, she wasn’t simple at all.

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Mary circa 1847 (wikicommons)

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