Archive for the Shownotes Category

Episode 62: A Conversation with Carol Wallace

Posted 5 February 2016 by
Tagged As: , , , | Categories: Podcasts, Shownotes | 1 Comment

Life. It’s funny, you know? Like the time both of us were sick for so long that we couldn’t record Catherine the Great Part 2 for this week’s show but, instead, have this conversation between Beckett and Carol Wallace?

Funny in a “well, that’s a little different” way.

In 2010 one of us- Beckett- wanted to hear a podcast like her favorite book of all time, To Marry an English Lord, by Gail MacColl and Carol Wallace, but couldn’t find one. So we made one.

In 2014 we had drinks with Carol Wallace.

In 2015 this conversation was recorded and lived in a computer until now.

The book that inspired this podcast AND Downton Abbey!

The book that inspired this podcast AND Downton Abbey!

Proof!  (Like, 80 proof)

Proof!
(Like, 80 proof)

 

There is talk of Downton Abbey (also inspired by Carol’s book) THIS IS THE SYNOPSIS OF THE EPISODE REFERENCED and some of our favorite Gilded Age Heiresses (THIS IS THE GILDED AGE HEIRESSES EPISODE) including Jennie Jerome (THIS IS OUR EPISODE ON HER LIFE). ( All links open in a new window- go check them out, we’ll be right here when you are done.)

Consuelo Vanderbilt, The Duchess of Marlborough by Helleu

Consuelo Vanderbilt, The Duchess of Marlborough by Helleu

If you would like to read more of Carol’s work (you do) THIS IS HER CURRENT WEBSITE and THIS IS A TREASURE trove of over 500 reviews of books she has read. If you haven’t watched her in the three-part Smithsonian documentary, Million Dollar American Princesses...why not? It’s fabulous.

Carol's latest!

Carol’s latest!

And we are both feeling much better!

Happy ending.

 

Episode 60: Four Inventors

Posted 12 December 2015 by
Tagged As: , , , , , , | Categories: Podcasts, Shownotes | Comments Off on Episode 60: Four Inventors

Lillian Gilbreth inspired us. After talking about her life and accomplishments, we thought it was high time to introduce you to four more problem-solving women whose inventions we use every day: Josephine Cochrane, Melitta Bentz, Mary Phelps Jacobs and Hedy Lamarr.

 

Chapter One: The Dishwasher

Josephine Cochrane was tired of her china being chipped during hand washing…so she invented the modern dishwasher and was granted a patent for it in 1886! Cochrane_J

(more…)

Episode 59: Lillian Gilbreth

Posted 28 November 2015 by
Tagged As: , , , , | Categories: Podcasts, Shownotes | Comments Off on Episode 59: Lillian Gilbreth

Lillian Gilbreth should be remembered for any of her life accomplishments: psychologist, industrial engineer, author, inventor, and pioneer in the field of industrial psychology. From her collection of degrees to her equal partnership marriage to her work with Presidents and to the trailblazing example she set for us modern mothers…she should be remembered for a lot more than simply, “the mother on Cheaper by the Dozen”.

Let’s do something about that.

 

Lillian Gilbreth, circa 1920s, Frank and Lillian Gilbreth papers, MSP 7, Box 126, Folder 4, Courtesy Archives and Special Collections, Purdue University Libraries

Lillian Gilbreth, circa 1920s,   Courtesy Frank and Lillian Gilbreth papers, (MSP 7, Box 126, Folder 4)  Archives and Special Collections, Purdue University Libraries

(more…)

Episode 58: Mary, Queen of Scots

Posted 13 November 2015 by
Tagged As: , , , , , | Categories: Podcasts, Shownotes | 1 Comment

Mary, Queen of Scots had a good start: she was wearing the crown early and upgraded it at a young age under the watchful eye of many an interested party but once she started making decisions for herself? Ah, that’s when her life took dramatic twists and turns that ultimately took the crown off her head. Actually, those decisions got her whole head taken off, but let’s start at the beginning, shall we?

Mary Stuart about age 16  wedding the Francis and before her life turned quite contrary. "MaryStuartbyClouet" by François Clouet - Royal CollectionNative nameRoyal Collection of the United KingdomLocationUnited KingdomEstablishedafter 1491Websitewww.royalcollection.org.uk. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MaryStuartbyClouet.jpg#/media/File:MaryStuartbyClouet.jpg

Mary Stuart about age 16 before her life turned quite contrary.
(François Clouet – Royal Collection via Wikimedia Commons)

Once upon a time in a rugged Renaissance land lived a king and a queen… (more…)

Episode 57: Q & A and Random Bits Show

Posted 5 October 2015 by
Tagged As: , , | Categories: Podcasts, Shownotes | 3 Comments

Heeeeere’s your seven word summary: We asked, you responded and we answer.

For the first time in the five years that we have been doing this show we sat down with a couple of glasses of wine to deviate from our normal format and answer some of your questions. We had asked for them and you delivered! From questions about specific episodes to hypothetical situations and research methods to some semi-personal questions…we answered them all. We even revealed some of the names on our extraordinarily long list of future subjects and did a really bad job of keeping our next subject secret. (In vino veritas and all)

We thought that this cocktail party chatter was a perfect way to give our new audio recording system the proper welcome that it deserves. Isn’t it pretty?

ooooh!

Ooooh!

Ahhhhh!

Ahhhhh! (Cool lamp in both of these shots)

(more…)

Episode 56: Dorothy Parker, Part Two

Posted 30 August 2015 by
Tagged As: , , , , | Categories: Podcasts, Shownotes | 1 Comment

dorothyparker framed

 

When we left Dorothy Parker in Part One she was hanging on tenuously at best. Her marriage to Eddie Parker was over, her relationship with George MacArthur was over and the fall-out somewhat stabilized and her suicide attempt was unsuccessful. Professionally she was cobbling together a career as a freelance writer but powered by a steady diet of alcohol she was dancing on the edge.

It was the wild 20s, afterall. (No, this isn't Dorothy)

It was the wild 20s, afterall. (No, this isn’t Dorothy, but you knew that)

(more…)

Episode 55: Dorothy Parker, Part One

Posted 8 August 2015 by
Tagged As: , , , , | Categories: Podcasts, Shownotes | Comments Off on Episode 55: Dorothy Parker, Part One

She gave us fabulous quotes like, “Men seldom make passes at girls who wear glasses” and “Brevity is the soul of lingerie,” but Dorothy Parker’s life wasn’t all wit and snark. Behind those flip one liners there was a very complex woman who lead a full life far beyond the banter of the Algonquin Round Table.

Dorothy ParkerHow complex was she and how full was her life? It’s going to take two episodes, that’s how much. (It’s okay, we were a little surprised, too.)

It was a dark and stormy night (what? It was!) when Dorothy Rothschild was born in West End, New Jersey at her family’s summer house on August 22, 1893. Her father Henry had fallen in love and married the girl next door, Eliza, and the pair had three children before Dorothy came along. They lived fairly affluently in New York; life as a Rothschild (not those Rothschilds) was very comfortable. (more…)

Episode 54: Marie Antoinette Reboot, Part Two

Posted 8 July 2015 by
Tagged As: , , , | Categories: Podcasts, Shownotes | Comments Off on Episode 54: Marie Antoinette Reboot, Part Two

In Part One we talked about Marie Antoinette’s childhood, the speedy preparations for marriage and her early years in France. In this episode, the conclusion of our revisit, we get to the rest of her story as she travels from well-liked to queen to the (dramatic pause) guillotine.

Near the end circa 1791Alexander_Kucharski,_La_Reine_Marie-Antoinette_(années_1790)

 

Husband, Louis XVI, while fumbly in the Create an Heir department and lacking a lot of things in common with her, was kind to Marie. During her, let’s call them “party years” he indulged her and gave her a little playhouse all her own so that she could escape the demands, traditions and all the backstabby, gossipy people of Versailles: Le Petite Trianon. It was a place Marie could let her hair down, grant admission to only those who she invited and frolic and dress like a fair country maiden (Disney World style– no need to actually take care of the animals, that’s what the servants are for).

Louis XVI. He gave her this...

Louis XVI. He gave her this…

Le Petite Trianon...Marie's playhouse

Le Petite Trianon, Marie’s playhouse…

Hans_Axel_von_Fersen2

…where she hung out with her friends including him. Axel Von Fersen (Dreamy, right?)

(more…)

Episode 53: Marie Antoinette Reboot, Part One

Posted 11 June 2015 by
Tagged As: , , , , | Categories: News, Podcasts, Shownotes | 42 Comments

**Giveaway details at bottom of post!**

Once upon a time there were two podcasters who began their women’s history show with an episode about Marie Antoinette. Four and a half years later they revisited her life simply because they felt there was more to say about this woman who has been long misquoted and misunderstood. They were able to add a great deal of content and context and have a much longer conversation -two parts!- about the life of the last Queen of France.

(The first episode was never heard again and we all lived happily ever after.)

Marie in her softened years, by Louise Elizabeth Vigee Le Brun

Marie in her softened years, by Louise Elizabeth Vigee Le Brun

(more…)

Episode 52: Lydia Pinkham

Posted 10 April 2015 by
Tagged As: , , | Categories: Podcasts, Shownotes | Comments Off on Episode 52: Lydia Pinkham

Women who need to be remembered often have Lemon to Lemonade lives and Lydia Pinkham is no exception. The going got tough and she turned some herbs (and a wee bit of alcohol)  into not only an empire but a leaping advance in women’s health and education.

Lydia Pinkham NWHM

 

Lydia Estes was born in Lynn, Massachusetts in 1819 into a family led by gentleman farmer, William, his wife, Rebecca and many brothers and sisters. Papa was a wise real estate speculator and they were fairly well-off. But this wasn’t some quiet, subdued Quaker family, oh no! They split with the local Quaker Meeting over the subject of slavery, the Estes family siding with good friend, former slave and abolitionist Fredrick Douglass. They opened their home for many abolitionist gatherings where the children and women were not only seen but heard.

Lydia grew to be a politically active and educated teacher who attracted the eye of widow Isaac Pinkham. On paper Isaac looked an awful lot like her father as far as business sense goes, but it was all paper. 30 years, four children, several upward then downward home moves when the Panic of 1873 hit family finances hard.  Isaac was emotionally down for the count and the family was fiscally ruined. (more…)