Search Results for: zelda

Episode 66: Zelda Fitzgerald

Posted 22 April 2016 by
Tagged As: , , , , , , , | Categories: Episode, Podcasts, Shownotes | Leave a Comment

Southern-born Flapper? Trophy wife of famous writer? Jazz Age fashion icon? Wild and selfish woman-child who went off the deep end?  Zelda Fitzgerald has been remembered in all of these ways – but none are entirely correct, nor do they describe this unique woman who lived a very complex life in an ever-changing world.

Zelda_Fitzgerald_portrait framed

Zelda was a southern born flapper. No argument there. Zelda Sayre began her life on July 24, 1900 in Montgomery, Alabama. She grew up in a socially prominent (although financially upper middle class at best) family as the loved-by-everyone, charming, energetic, brave and highjinky youngest child. She was a skilled ballet dancer, a fearless flirt and an incomparable Orange Blossom sipping beauty. Young gentlemen filled her dance card, frat boys swore their devotion to her and aviators flew over her house just to be noticed by her.

She became a Jazz Age icon and first wave flapper when she and her new husband–freshly published, (gasp!) Yankee writer, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald– arrived in New York City to a life of instant literary fame in 1920. She defined the flapper: bold, brave, reckless and fun loving young women who threw off stuffy formality along with their corsets. Zelda and Scott lived a very public life of opulence as the poster couple for the wild, monied and creative set in both the US and Europe. Wherever they went partying followed; whatever they did somehow was used as material for Scott’s novels, articles and short stories. His second book, The Beautiful and the Damned, was so filled with their likenesses the publisher went ahead and marketed it with a couple that looked an awful lot like them on the cover.Beautifuldamed

The whole Youth on a Wild Bender life sounds kind of dreamy…for a short time, but the pair made “never settling down” a lifestyle. Even the birth of their only child, Frances Scott Fitzgerald (Scottie) didn’t slow them down. New York, Paris, the Riviera, Hollywood…they kept moving, Scott kept writing (and drinking), Zelda kept helping to critique (and write) his work and giving him fodder for the novels, short stories and articles that supported them. But the more Zelda lost herself into their marriage–into Scott’s literature–the more troubled she became.

Circa 1921, Zelda was pregnant with Scottie. (wikicommons)

Circa 1921, Zelda was pregnant with Scottie. (wikicommons)

We give a disclaimer that we TRIED to achieve middle-ground between Team Scott (she was his muse but also his crazy wife who pulled him down) and Team Zelda (she was an emotionally abused wife whose mental condition had more to do with an alcoholic husband, exhaustion and unnecessary and harmful medical treatment than simply an existing mental illness). We probably failed to completely achieve middle-ground.

We’re okay with that.

Zelda tried to find and throw herself into creative outlets for herself ONLY–her OWN writing, ballet dancing, painting all of which she was very good at. These activities worked to help her express herself and to keep it together…until they didn’t. His behavior towards her– multiple affairs (she wasn’t exactly innocent here, either), alcohol induced dramas, panic from massive debts mounting, dismissing her art, her writing, her value, and blaming her for any family failures– only pushed her spiral downward.

The wife, the girl friend. hmmm...

The wife, the Hollywood girl friend. hmmm…

When Zelda was hospitalized in 1930 she was immediately diagnosed as schizophrenic (most likely incorrectly diagnosed) and moved (was forced?) into the next phase of her life: 18 years spent in and out of mental institutions. As part of her therapy she painted and wrote an autobiographical novel, Save Me the Waltz, that allowed her to tell her story through her lens, not Scott’s. She sent it to Scott’s publisher behind his back, but in the end he still managed to put his imprint on the book.

Zelda-The-first-edition-cover-of-Save-Me-the-Waltz-1932

 

We tell a lot more of Zelda’s story in the podcast, give anecdotes and opinions to fill in the black and white impression that many have of her very colorful life.

Scott Fitzgerald died of a heart attack in 1940. Eight years later, on March 10, 1948 Zelda was locked into her room for the night at Highland hospital in Ashville, North Carolina, the psychiatric facility where she had been living, when a fire broke out and she died. She was 48 years old. She is buried with Scott and Scottie (who lived a long and pretty normal life) in Maryland.  The words on their tombstone is the final sentence from Scott’s most famous book, The Great Gatsby:

“So we beat on; boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

flikr cc Mr.TinDC

Even in death, Scott got the last word. Maybe spending an hour listening to her story will let Zelda’s voice be heard.

 

TIME TRAVEL WITH THE HISTORY CHICKS

We dug up a hefty collection of links and materials that would make Zelda blush with pride. Probably.

We’ll start off by bucking convention (Zelda would have it no other way) and get you in the mood with the end song that we didn’t play. Tiny Victories, Scott and Zelda

Websites:

You want to see her art (you do, trust us) and instead of breaking copyright laws we’ll simply send you to ART.COM. (Not sponsored, we always tell you if something is.) 

Fitzgerald Museum in Montgomery Alabama, housed in the last house the couple rented 1931-’32. Going would be your best bet, but clicking through the collections online is a good second place.

Fitzgerald Museum

Fitzgerald Museum

Scott and Zelda website, by their family– it’s pretty.

You really, really  REALLY ought to go check out our Pinterest board for Zelda.

 

BOOKS

Edited by Matthew Bruccoli

Edited by Matthew Bruccoli

2011 Nancy Milford

2011 Nancy Milford

2012 Sally Cline

2012 Sally Cline

Theresa Anne Fowler

Fiction: Theresa Anne Fowler

MOVIES

We didn’t talk much about it but did touch on the 2011 Woody Allen film, Midnight in Paris. Here is a scene, you tell us if you think Alison Pill as Zelda is what you imagined her to be.

Zelda Fitzgerald: The Musical, You can watch the whole thing on this site. Theater! Without leaving the house! In your jammies or MeUndies loungewear! (That is totally sponsored)

Not a movie, but the Amazon Prime original,  Z: The Beginning of Everything has one episode with Christina Ricci as Zelda available to stream for the low, low price of $0.00.

We couldn’t help (when we lined-up with Team Zelda) but think back to Gaslight with Ingrid Bergman, the 1944 movie about a man who makes his wife believe that she is crazy.

THIS AND THAT

Do you find yourself on Team Zelda? We have a shirt for that. Check out our shop for all our Chick Gear.

History Chicks Baby/Pet/Car Name Guide entry: Zelda. Read all about the name at Appellation Mountain.

You guys all know to Snopes something before you share it, right? (It’s okay, we’ve all done it once or twice). Here is the story behind the List of Reasons for Admission to an Insane Asylum, early 1900s. 

If you are drawn to Zelda because of an interest in psychotherapy (as in learning about it, not necessarily undergoing it) (not that there is anything wrong with that) here is the handy dandy guide that Beckett mentioned comparing Jung and Freud. 

They make it look so easy…and no Dippity Do! (Which, apparently, is still a thing! Dippity-Do.com)

**************

 Music provided by Music Alley

Chronological Subjects

Posted 13 September 2017 by
Tagged As: | Categories: | Comments Off on Chronological Subjects

We don’t cover women in chronological order, we cover them in no order. We’re zipping all over time and continents like a TARDIS set to RANDOM: Ancient Rome to late 1800s Poland then pretty soon we’re in 1600s Africa. But we do appreciate that some people would like to listen to our show in chronological order and thanks to our amazingly organized friend, Sarah Frawley, they can.

2021 update: We weren’t great at keeping this list current with our episodes, so a very kind and organized listener, Nancy G. Rosoff, took pity on us and made this fancy spreadsheet with the hopes of keeping it updated. If she can’t…well, she’s in very good company. You can find this at: History Chicks Chronology. Thanks so much, Nancy!!

 

Episodes in Chronological Order, with Links

 

Hatshepsut…1507-1458 BCE…#45

Cleopatra VII…69-30 BCE…#46

Agrippina the Younger…15-59…#73

Hypatia of Alexandria…355?-415…#95

Eleanor of Aquitaine…1122-1204…#86

Joan of Arc…1412-1431…#51

Tudor Grandmothers…1441/43-1509; 1466-1503…#21

Katherine of Aragon…1485-1536…#22

Anne Boleyn…1501/1507-1536…Minicast

Last Four Wives of Henry VIII…1508-1537; 1515-1557; 1521-1542; 1512-1548…#24

Queen Mary I…1516-1558…#30

Grace O’Malley…1530-1603…#109

Lady Jane Grey…1536/1537-1554…#31

Elizabeth I…1533-1603…#43, 44

Mary, Queen of Scots…1542-1587…#58

Elizabeth Bathory…1560-1614…#118

Queen Nzinga…1583-1663…#80

Artemisia Gentileschi…1593-1653…#85

Pocahontas…1596-1617…#99

Madame de Pompadour…1721-1764…#19

Catherine the Great…1729-1796…#61,62

Abigail Adams…1744-1818…#4

Phillis Wheatley…1753-1784…#119

Marie Antoinette…1755-1793…#53, 54

Schuyler Sisters…1756-1814; 1757-1854; 1758-1801…#71

The Duchess of Devonshire…1757-1806…#17

Mary Wollstonecraft…1759-1797…#16

Sybil Ludington…1761-1839…Minicast

Dolley Madison…1768-1849…#5

Jane Austen…1775-1817…#38

Sophie Blanchard…1778-1819…Minicast

Princess Charlotte…1796-1817…#13

Mary Shelley…1797-1851…#Minicast

Sojourner Truth…1797-1883…#96

Marie Laveau…1801-1881…#89

Elizabeth Cady Stanton…1815-1902…#36

Ada Lovelace…1815-1852…#103

Mary Todd Lincoln…1818-1882#69, 70

Queen Victoria…1818-1901….#11,12

Elizabeth Keckley…1818-1907…#72

Lydia Pinkham…1819-1883…#52

Clara Barton…1821-1912…#14

Harriet Tubman…1822-1913…#117

“The” Mrs. Astor…1830-1908…#8

Belva Lockwood…1830-1917…#77

Louisa May Alcott…1832-1888…#104

Victoria Woodhull…1838-1927…#76

Queen Lili’Oukalani…1838-1917…#97

Annie Chambers…1842-1935…Minicast

Belle Starr…1843-1889…#115

Carry (Carrie) Nation…1846-1911…#47

Calamity Jane…1852-1903…#115

Empress Cixi…1853-1908…#105

Gilded Age Heiresses…1853-1909; 1853-1919; 1870-1906…#9

Jennie Jerome Churchill…1854-1921…#10

Annie Oakley…1860-1926…#92

Lizzie Borden…1860-1927…#6

Jane Addams…1860-1935 #112, 113

Ida B. Wells…1862-1931…#25

Nellie Bly…1864-1922…#20

Anne Sullivan Macy…1866-1936…Minicast

Wallis Simpson…1869-1986…#93/94

Beatrix Potter…1866-1943…#64

Madam C.J. Walker…1867-1919…#68

Margaret “Molly” Brown…1867-1932…#23

Marie Curie…1867-1934…#74, 75

Laura Ingalls Wilder…1867-1957…#2

Romanovs…1872-1918…#32, 33

Emily Post…1872-1960…#91

Four Inventors…1873-1950; 1839-1913; 1891-1970; 1914-2000…#60

Lucy Maud Montgomery…1874-1942…#88

Lillian Gilbreth…1878-1972…#59

Helen Keller…1880-1968…#7

Coco Chanel…1883-1971…#98

Georgia O’Keeffe…1887-1986…#110

Agatha Christie…1890-1976…#48

Bessie Coleman…1892-1926…#41

Mary Pickford…1892-1979…#107

Statue of Liberty…1886-?…#108

Wallis Simpson…1896-1986…#94

Amelia Earhart…1897-1937…#39

Hattie McDaniel…1895-1952…#50

Dorothy Parker…1893-1967…#55, 56

Zelda Fitzgerald…1900-1948…#66

Clara Bow…1905-1965…#27

Josephine Baker…1906-1975…#34, 35

Frida Kahlo…1907-1954…#42

Lucille Ball…1911-1989…#82,83

Julia Child…1912-2004…#29

Rosa Parks…1913-2005…#26

Ella Fitzgerald…1917-1996…#18

Shirley Chisholm…1924-2005…#78

Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis…1929-1994…#100/101

Audrey Hepburn…1929-1993…#120

Anne Frank…1929-1945…#114

Barbie!…1959-…#116

 

 

 

 

 

Episode 71: Schuyler Sisters with Amanda Vaill

Posted 25 June 2016 by
Tagged As: , , , , , , | Categories: Episode, Podcasts, Shownotes | Leave a Comment

schuyler sisters

Since the musical Hamilton opened on Broadway we’ve been getting a lot of requests to cover the Schuyler sisters, Angelica, Eliza and Peggy. (You sang that, right?) But we couldn’t make it work because there wasn’t enough material available to us to fill a whole show in the way we would want to…so we met someone who could:.

Author Amanda Vaill.

(more…)

Episode 67: Q&A Number Two

Posted 2 May 2016 by
Tagged As: , , , | Categories: Episode, Podcasts, Shownotes | Leave a Comment

 

What would you serve Dorothy Parker for dinner? When are you covering the Schuyler sisters? What would you tell your high school history teacher? We get a lot of questions and love them all (except maybe the mean ones). Some are asked quite often or were so good that we thought, “hmmm, maybe a lot more people would like to know this but were too busy to ask it, perhaps we should have a colloquy,” (because we’re fancy like that.)

And then Beckett talked Susan out of actually using the word, “colloquy.”

See? Fancy.

See? Fancy.

(more…)